• New Members Discussion Forum

    New Members Discussion Forum

  • SHSM & OYAP Hospitality Programs Leading Through Nutrition Technology

    SHSM & OYAP Hospitality Programs Leading Through Nutrition Technology

  • STEM Activities Give Students the Freedom to Think Critically and Creatively

    STEM Activities Give Students the Freedom to Think Critically and Creatively

  • Supported by Dedicated Tech Educators and Programs, Students Can Achieve Great Things

    Supported by Dedicated Tech Educators and Programs, Students Can Achieve Great Things

  • Teaching Technological Education Lets Us Share Knowledge That Builds Industry

    Teaching Technological Education Lets Us Share Knowledge That Builds Industry

  • Hands-on Experiential Learning Creates Environments for Innovation

    Hands-on Experiential Learning Creates Environments for Innovation

  • Hands-on Resources for TXJ Hairstyling and Aesthetics, Personal Care

    Hands-on Resources for TXJ Hairstyling and Aesthetics, Personal Care

  • Early introduction of STEM activities fosters a lifelong love of learning.

    Early introduction of STEM activities fosters a lifelong love of learning.

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Take Tech

Introduction to Take Tech

Take Tech Posters

Download the OCTE take tech posters

OCTE RESOURCES

We want all technological education teachers in Ontario to be able to think through the stages of their projects and learning activities they do with students. Submitting your lesson through SafetyNET means you have a reflective lens for before, during and after you have fun with your students, and protect yourself as a professional educator.

OCTE Best Practice resources are resources and lesson plans submitted by teachers like you. These resources are made available thanks to the commitment and involvement of partners from across Ontario.

SAFEdocs documents were written by OCTE members sponsored by the Ministry of Education in 2013 and align safety resources to the 2009 Technological Education curriculum document.

A .pdf print out of QR codes for teachers is available with cut lines for teachers to stick onto their classroom tools, equipment, and processes. Students will be able to view the video in a class session, re-review on their devices, listen to the .mp3 to lessen the download, or look at the video content transcription. There are lesson plans that go with each one.

Find your next great resource. Click to browse OCTE's online resources library

CONSIDERING A CAREER IN TECH ED?

Are you or someone you know considering a career as a technological educator? Check out the program at York University. To meet the needs of the candidates, the program offers a variety of delivery options, a credit for prior learning and experience, and instructors who are certified technology teachers with industry experience.

Click here for more information

Sponsors & Affiliations

Proudly Supporting the Canadian Welding Foundation's Mind Over Metal camps

As part of our commitment to social responsibility and community support, OCTE is proud to dedicate our annual charitable donation to this outstanding organization. Click here to read more.

cwb welding foundation logo

Click here to nominate someone for an OCTE Awards
Click here to submit a comment about OCTE or the OCTE website
resources page link

Safety Tip of the Month

Basic Rules of Ladder Safety

In Canada, 14,000 people are injured annually while using ladders. The following are basic rules of ladder safety.

RULE 1: SELECT THE RIGHT LADDER FOR THE JOB

There are many types of ladders available, each intended for a specific purpose.

CSA grade I (ANSI Type I Industrial)– Heavy-duty with a load capacity not more than 250 pounds (construction and Industrial)

CSA grade II (ANSI Type II Commercial)– Medium-duty with a load capacity not more than 225 pounds (Trades and Farm).

CSA grade III (ANSI Type III Household)- Light duty with a load capacity not more than 200 pounds.

Regardless of the type or construction be sure the ladder has label certifying that it complies with specifications of the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) and/ or the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and that it is listed by Underwriter Laboratories. Be sure the ladder is long enough to work from without using the top 3 feet.

RULE 2: INSPECT THE LADDER BEFORE YOU BEFORE YOU USE IT
Any ladder can develop a problem which can render it unsafe. Every time you use a ladder, inspect it for loose or damaged rungs, steps, rails or braces. Also check for loose screws, bolts, hinges and other hardware. If the ladder has any type of defect, it must be repaired or the ladder must be replaced. Never use a ladder which is defective.
RULE 3: SET UP THE LADDER WITH CARE
Inspect the work site. Lock or block any nearby door that opens toward you. The area around the base should be uncluttered, and the ladder should be set on a solid, level surface. Stepladders should be fully opened. Straight ladder should be placed at a four-to-one ratio. This means the base should be one foot away from the wall or other vertical surface for every four feet of height to the point of support. lf you plan to climb onto a roof or platform from a ladder, the ladder must extend above the edge at least three feet and be tied off at the top.
RULE 4: CLIMB AND DESCEND LADDERS CAUTIOUSLY
Always face the ladder and use both hands to climb and descent. Keep three points of contact on the ladder at all times. Carry tools in a tool belt or raise and lower them with a hand line.
RULE 5: USE COMMON SENSE WHEN WORKING ON A LADDER
Always hold on with one hand and never reach too far to either side or to the rear. Never climb higher than the second step from the top on a stepladder or the third from the top on straight ladder.

In 2019 a new ladder regulation was introduced in Ontario

As of 2019, Section 73 of regulation 851 states that portable ladders must:

(a) be free from broken or loose members or other faults;

(b) have non-slip feet;

(c) be placed on a firm footing;

(d) where it,

(i) exceeds six metres in length and is not securely fastened, or

(ii) is likely to be endangered by traffic,

be held in place by one or more workers while being used; and

(e) when not securely fastened, be inclined so that the horizontal distance from the top support to the foot of the ladder is not less than 1/4 and not more than 1/3 of the length of the ladder (e.g. a 10 foot ladder should be not less than 2.5 feet and not greater than 3 feet at the base)

Falls are not the only risk presented by inappropriate use of ladders. Musculoskeletal disorders (or MSDs) are a risk when ladders are transported incorrectly, or when a worker’s materials are not hoisted or handled with the right precautions.

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

Ladders - Step : OSH Answers (ccohs.ca)

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